Gas Prices On The Rise

For the first time this summer, the national average for a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline is $3.50.

The price of gas increased 17 cents per gallon since March. In July, costs went up 5.1 percent, making the gain the highest for any month on record since 2000.

According to the American Automobile Association, the jump at the pump can be attributed to record high corn prices.

For three months, drivers were able to enjoy declining gas prices, as oil fell from more than $100 per barrel in March to below $78 by late June.

AAA predicted that gas prices will most likely remain around $3.50 a gallon, or climb slightly in August and decrease when the summer driving season comes to a close after Labor Day.

The highest national average for gas this year was $3.93 per gallon, when oil topped $100 per barrel.

Demand for gas is still lower than it was in 2011, as consumers have cut back on spending.

A new survey by the AAA reports that motorists are changing habits due to rising gas prices.

The survey found that 23 percent of drivers reported that they would drive less if gas rises above $3.50 per gallon. Thirty-eight of respondents said they wouldn’t change driving habits unless gas rises above $4 per gallon.

The top three things people have cut back on due to rising gas prices are shopping and eating out at restaurants.

Better fuel economy among vehicles has also cut gas usage.

To find the most up-to-date local gas prices, visit AAA.com. You can also check out our list of ways to control fuel consumption and tips that will help you keep your gas tank in check.

About Brittney French

Brittney is a journalist and media relations specialist who lives in St. Louis, Mo. When she's not blogging for Lebanon Ford, she is the author of a women's column and also writes about music, events, and St. Louis sports. Having little knowledge in the automotive industry, Brittney provides valuable insight on cars for those who may be in the same boat. She can be found on Facebook and Twitter @brittfrancois.